DADDY'S BEEMER - "Pucker"

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Daddy's Beemer - "Pucker"

(Pablo Generation)

Imagine standing in the center of the obligatory party scene of every youth culture movie: the living room lights are low and young people clutch plastic cups of whatever, dancing as if only this very moment matters. Cut to that moment when your crush steps in through the front door. For a few moments you have their undivided attention, and the two of you dance like every other sentient being has suddenly vanished from reality. Soon, your dance ends, and that person for whom you pine leaves the party hand-in-hand with your worst enemy. The angst sets in like a bowling ball lowering onto your stomach. For the rest of the movie, you learn valuable life lessons about letting go; maybe you pick up smoking, maybe not, but in the end you get that satisfying moment of clarity in your solitude- you’re strong enough to make it on your own.

These are the images evoked in my mind as I listen to Brady Sklar’s impassioned wails as they settle in over his vigorous guitar strumming. When layered with the lead guitar explorations of Luke Waldrop, Wesley Heaton’s smooth bass tones, and the reliable rhythms of Dan Fetterolf, the resulting combination is a blend of Slack Rock and New Wave that sets Daddy’s Beemer apart from many of their collegiate indie-rock contemporaries.

Pucker sounds familiar- almost reminiscent of beloved tracks by bands like The Cure, but it doesn’t take a trained ear to hear a distinctness. Daddy’s Beemer has its own singular voice that its members have painstakingly honed. The E.P. is self-produced, each layer of instrumentation and vocalization laboriously shaped and fit into its place by Sklar before being mastered by Matthew Garber at B-Side Mastering. In short- do you need to dance? Do you need to commiserate with the broken-hearted? Do you need some reassurance? Or do you just need to re-live your own youth for 23 minutes and 42 seconds on your commute to your oppressive grown-up job? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, consider adding Pucker to today’s playlist.

Mark H. Jones

Pucker is available at these locations:

Bandcamphttp://dadsbeem.bandcamp.com

Spotifyhttp://spotify:album:7A1IjbR1DG2ySA2SYc3NFR

iTuneshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/album/pucker-ep/1344290548

Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B079KKJ8TW/ ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_U_x_HNL5Ab612W5NX

GooglePlay: https://play.google.com/store/music/album/ Daddy_s_Beemer_Pucker_EP?id=Bfuv6sra5uz6zqt3gp7ymuzwx6m

Editor’s note: Daddy’s Beemer is one of the founding bands of The Pablo Generation collective in Clemson, South Carolina. They appear on episode 038 of Mark's podcast, The Hoodoo Music Podcast- available on major podcast platforms or by visiting http://bit.ly/localbandpod

Mark H. Jones is the host and producer of The Hoodoo Music Podcast; a fortnightly program featuring live performances and interviews with artists in, around, and passing through the South Carolina upstate. The podcast and his other work can be found at http://RootDoctorMedia.com